Dom & Jeremy

It’s Denver’s favorite morning radio show! And that’s not just US saying it – the Colorado Broadcasters Association has etched our names on a bunch of plaques.

Dom has hosted the morning show for a LONG time. (Let’s put it this way: there are college seniors who weren’t born yet when Dom started at Mix 100.) Jeremy has also been making you laugh with his quirky stories and wacky sense of humor since 2004!

Join us weekday mornings for a ton of laughs, the Trending Report, Rattle Off, and the most popular radio contest in the world, The Mindbender.

You can listen online, on your smartphone (just search for “Mix 100 Denver” in your phone’s app store), smart speakers – or enjoy to thousands of our podcasts at Mix100.com. No matter how you find us, you’ll quickly become part of our family. Thanks for starting your day with Dom and Jeremy! YOUR BOYZ IN THE MORNING!


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Jeremy Padgett

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Morning Podcasts

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November 19, 2018

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Jeremy
21.5
Kris
22.5

Review: 2019 Toyota C-HR


Subcompact crossover vehicles are becoming quite the rage, because they offer the kind of utility/cargo space that on-the-go urbanites are looking for, without the gargantuan size. Basically, they’ll dart around town and they’re easy to park.

The Toyota C-HR was originally going to be produced under the Scion brand until that division was shut down.

It provides a fun, sporty look with capable handling and good mileage. What it doesn’t provide is peppy acceleration, nor all-wheel-drive — which surprised me. Coloradoans will have to make do with front-wheel-drive only.

(For what it’s worth, I drove to the radio station one day in the snow and the C-HR handled like a champ.)

The Basics

The C-HR (which stands for Compact High Rider) is available this year in three trim levels, after Toyota added the upper-tier Limited model for this year. The base unit is the LE, followed by the XLE (which I drove).Continue Reading

Review: 2019 Toyota Avalon Hybrid

I’ve been reviewing cars for about 20 years, and it’s becoming rare to find myself behind the wheel of a sedan. Car makers are definitely caught up in the country’s infatuation with SUVs and crossover vehicles, to the extent that some are in the midst of pretty much phasing out their lineups of sedans. (Ford is a prime example.)

So, given that trend, I think I like the way Toyota is handling this. They’re essentially saying, “Thanks we’ll take the whole pie.”

And while they could’ve just taken the market by keeping things status quo with their own models, instead they’re upping the sedan game. Case in point: the redesigned 2019 Avalon and Avalon Hybrid.

I spent a week driving the hybrid version, and came away very impressed.

My own personal vehicle is a Lexus hybrid, part of the Toyota family, so I wasn’t surprised by the quality of the Avalon, both in materials and in ride. But it’s interesting to see how the hybrid price-bump is shrinking over the years, to the point now that the difference between this and the regular all-gas-power Avalon is minimal. Your fuel savings should make up the difference quickly.Continue Reading

Review: 2018 Subaru BRZ tS

It’s not very often that you find two big players in the automotive world working together to create a car. But that’s exactly what happened when Toyota partnered with Subaru to develop a sporty little number called the 86 under the Toyota badge and the BRZ when Subaru’s name is on the back.

The cars are not identical, but they’re pretty close. Some even refer to them as “the twins.” Subie upped the game a bit when they introduced the tS trim level for their BRZ. Before we get completely lost in the alphabet soup of car makers, let’s explain:

The tS is short for “tuned by STI.”
STI is the abbreviation for Subaru Tecnica International, the motorsports division of Subaru. It was formed in the late 80s to spearhead the company’s pursuit of road racing success.
And the BRZ? That’s shorthand for Boxer engine, Rear-wheel drive, and Z for the zenith.

Whew. Let’s move on.


The Basics

First, I need to point out that this is truly a limited-edition car. Subaru planned for only 500 of the tS models for 2018, and somehow I was able to get my mitts on one of them and get it back to Subaru in one piece.Continue Reading

Dom’s Book Club for November, 2018: In Harm’s Way, by Doug Stanton

The first time I remember hearing about the USS Indianapolis was watching the scene in the movie Jaws where the guys are comparing scars and stories. Captain Quint sports a tattoo of the Indy, and proceeds to tell an abbreviated version of one of the most horrific real-life episodes in naval history.

Fast-forward to this summer when I devoured a book about that same topic in about four days. It’s called In Harm’s Way, and it’s downright chilling.

To condense the story for this post, the USS Indianapolis was the American warship that delivered the first atomic bomb to an island in the Philippine Sea. A few days later the ship was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine and sank quickly.

Almost 1200 men went into the shark-infested ocean, with only a few in lifeboats. The rest bobbed along wearing flimsy life jackets. But worst of all, nobody in naval command knew they’d been sunk. They were alone in the middle of a treacherous ocean with no help on the way.

Doug Stanton does a terrific job of setting the scene, describing the misery and fear these sailors experienced as they watched dehydration, sun, and sharks begin to take down the crew.

I won’t give away anything else. Just know that this was one of my favorite books of the year. It’s a riveting, dramatic telling, and the fact that it’s all true only adds to the reader’s anxiety.

Pick up In Harm’s Way at your nearest Tattered Cover Book Store. Mention Dom’s Book Club and they’ll knock 20% off the price of this title.

Happy reading!
Dom

Review: 2019 Subaru Ascent Touring

Subaru, already a big hit in Colorado, is back in the SUV game after quietly giving up on the disappointing Tribeca a few years ago. The designers went off to a room, licked their wounds, then rolled up their sleeves and forged an all-new midsize SUV with a third row that competes with the likes of the Honda Pilot or the Toyota Highlander (which I reviewed recently here).

And voila! The Subie factory in Indiana is now rolling out a respectable — and potentially successful — new kid on the block. With its capacity to hold 7 or 8 eight passengers (depending upon seat choices) and Subaru’s devotion to all-wheel-drive, the Ascent looks like it could make some noise in the SUV world.

The Basics

The Ascent comes in four trim levels, starting with the aptly-named Base and working up through the Premium, Limited, and Touring. For one week I tooled around in the Touring edition.

Each of these versions comes with a 2.4-liter direct injection turbocharged engine, paired with continuously variable transmission. The power plant puts out 260 horsepower.

While many of its competitors sport a V6, the Ascent’s 4-cylinder engine gets the job done. I never felt like I was wanting for oomph, and one side effect is basically a quieter ride.

If you’re in Colorado and demand an SUV that can truly leave the pavement, you’ll find more than 8 inches of ground clearance here.Continue Reading

Review: 2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

For a little over twenty years Mitsubishi produced a sporty little car named after a British racehorse from the 1700s that started 18 races and won every time. But, just like the thoroughbred racer which went on to stud duty, the popular little car also left the circuit. The last Mitsubishi Eclipse was produced in 2011 and immediately auctioned off for charity.

While the horse eventually sired hundreds of future prize winners, Mitsubishi would be thrilled if the Eclipse scored with its own progeny – in this case, a crossover vehicle that borrows the venerable old name.

Introducing the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross, a compact crossover SUV that premiered in Geneva about 18 months ago and received additional exposure when the car was promoted during the American solar eclipse a few months later.Continue Reading

Review: 2018 Toyota Highlander Hybrid

Alumina jade metallic. You could’ve given me 10,000 guesses regarding the color of the new Toyota Highlander Hybrid I drove in early October, and I wouldn’t have come up with that.

But suddenly I’m a fan of alumina jade metallic. Kinda classy in its yellowish-green sheen, and the kind of hue that helps you find your car in the parking lot amongst all the white, silver, and black options.

Oh, and the vehicle itself kicked ass.

The Basics

C’mon, Toyota has been out front with hybrid technology ever since they took a chance with a funny-looking thing called a Prius in 1997 (although it didn’t hit US shores until three years later).

Now, twenty years in, it’s hard to argue that they’re not the leader in this category. And once their hybrid technology began seeping into other segments it became a game changer.

The Highlander, already a popular option in the mid-size SUV/crossover category, gives you more to love when that gas mileage creeps up near the 30-mpg range. On top of that it’s a quiet, comfortable ride that (on paper at least) seats seven with the second-row captain’s chairs in the model I drove. The third row, in all honesty, isn’t the most spacious, but the neighbor kids would fit.Continue Reading

Review: 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan

My first question about the Volkswagen Tiguan was simple: What’s the origin of that name? And I’m glad I looked it up, because it gave me a good chuckle.

And now you wanna know, right? Well, the name is a result of a contest held by a Germany car magazine. One of the entries was a mashup of two German words for Tiger and Iguana. I don’t know why that’s funny to me, but it is.

As for the vehicle itself, it’s been years since I drove a Volkswagen, and I was impressed with the look, the materials, and the tech features. Not so impressed with one particular element of the drive, but more on that in a bit.

The Basics

Not long ago I reviewed a car that came in just one trim style, which is (a) unusual, but also (b) kinda refreshing. It’s like the car maker said “This is our car. Why make a bunch of versions?”

Volkswagen does not share that attitude. The Tiguan is offered in five, count ‘em, five trim levels. And it’s a tad confusing for us silly Americans because we’re used to cars labeled “Limited” to be one of the top-tier levels of a model. In the Tiguan the Limited is the base model. I spent a week in the top of the line SEL Premium.Continue Reading

Review: 2018 Nissan Rogue Sport

Quick, what’s the bestselling car in Nissan’s stable? If you’d asked me yesterday (before I cheated and looked) I’d have guessed either the Maxima or the Altima. Maybe the Sentra.

Nope. The Altima and Maxima have been around – and quite popular – since the early 80s, but neither of them stands up to the sales figures for the Rogue, which is barely ten years old.

The Rogue’s little brother, the Rogue Sport, is practically a baby, introduced in ’17. After a week behind the wheel I can tell you it’s a great addition to the family.

The Basics

I like Nissan’s strategy of taking its big-seller and crafting a smaller, sportier version for a younger market. It’s not designed to be a racehorse – and it’s certainly not – but the Rogue Sport provides a good alternative for people searching for a compact/crossover SUV.

There are three trim levels to choose from, the S, SV, and SL (I drove the SV), and all three can be found with either front-wheel-drive or intuitive all-wheel-drive.Continue Reading

Dom’s Book Club for October, 2018: Ghost Story, by Peter Straub

I like to choose scary books each year for the month of Halloween, and this year I’m going with Straub’s classic tale of a haunted past.

Some will tell you this isn’t truly a ghost story (despite the name), but I actually like the fact it’s as much psychological thriller as it is classic horror. One reviewer called it a “spooky tale of supernatural revenge.”

Five older men, calling themselves The Chowder Society, meet each year in the (fictional) town of Milburn, New York where they reminisce about their college years 50 years earlier. But when one of them dies, the stories they tell begin to morph.

It turns out they were all involved in the accidental death of a young woman, a killing that was never reported. Is the ghost of this woman back to haunt their remaining years?

Peter Straub has won numerous awards for his writing, including multiple Bram Stoker awards for horror. He’s teamed with Stephen King a few times (including The Talisman, another fun chiller), and there’s talk they’ll collaborate again soon.

For now, enjoy the creepy story of regret and revenge as my selection for October. Pick it up at any location of The Tattered Cover Book Store. When you mention Dom’s Book Club you’ll receive 20% off the price of this title.

Boo!

Dom In The Morning Blog

Denver7’s Toy Drive

Tis the season for giving… Denver7’s Toy Drive is December 7th. In Colorado, approximately 166,000 children live in poverty. Join Denver7 in collecting toys for the holidays.  On December 7th from 6am to 7pm, they will be at three Walmart locations collecting new toys and cash donations. The donations will be distributed by Kenzi’s Causes, A Precious Child and Denver Santa Claus Shop.

They need unwrapped toys for children of all ages. Throughout the day the Denver7 anchors and reporters will be on site helping to collect the toys. Volunteers from each charity will also be on hand to help collect.

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Denver7’s Toy Drive

Tis the season for giving… Denver7’s Toy Drive is December 7th. In Colorado, approximately 166,000 children live in poverty. Join Denver7 in collecting toys for the holidays.  On December 7th from 6am to 7pm, they will be at three Walmart locations collecting new toys and cash donations. The donations will be distributed by Kenzi’s Causes, A Precious Child and Denver Santa Claus Shop.

They need unwrapped toys for children of all ages. Throughout the day the Denver7 anchors and reporters will be on site helping to collect the toys. Volunteers from each charity will also be on hand to help collect.

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Review: 2019 Toyota C-HR


Subcompact crossover vehicles are becoming quite the rage, because they offer the kind of utility/cargo space that on-the-go urbanites are looking for, without the gargantuan size. Basically, they’ll dart around town and they’re easy to park.

The Toyota C-HR was originally going to be produced under the Scion brand until that division was shut down.

It provides a fun, sporty look with capable handling and good mileage. What it doesn’t provide is peppy acceleration, nor all-wheel-drive — which surprised me. Coloradoans will have to make do with front-wheel-drive only.

(For what it’s worth, I drove to the radio station one day in the snow and the C-HR handled like a champ.)

The Basics

The C-HR (which stands for Compact High Rider) is available this year in three trim levels, after Toyota added the upper-tier Limited model for this year. The base unit is the LE, followed by the XLE (which I drove).

All three come with a standard 2.0-liter, 4 cylinder engine which puts out 144 horsepower. The exterior styling is one of the things current owners seem to point out often, with its somewhat-edgy design and charismatic stance.

One of those catchy gimmicks is a rear-door handle that’s up high, near the roof line. I never could decide if I liked that or not, but at least it’s interesting.

You’ll find a decent stock of standard features regardless of the trim level, but you will have to upgrade to the Limited if you want leather upholstery or heated front seats.

My XLE sports 18-inch alloy wheels and a nice slew of Toyota safety systems, including power-folding mirrors and keyless ignition.

The Interior

You’ll get some good with a little bit of not-so-good. I found the front seats to be pretty comfortable, even with the somewhat-limited choices of seat adjustments. Riders in the back will find a decent amount of room, especially considering this is a subcompact crossover.

Those passengers in the back will have to make do with limited visibility, too, as the roof pillars require you to lean forward in order to get a good glimpse of the passing world. Or maybe your passengers would simply appreciate the privacy.

I like the layout of the dash and the displays, which all seemed easy to read and to work with. Visibility for the driver and front passenger are quite good.

Let’s call the upfront storage space adequate. Again, it’s a smaller vehicle so we shouldn’t expect cavernous bins. Up front you get a traditional round cupholder and another with that hip, new square holder that accommodates awkward containers. The center armrest bin is good-sized.

Lower the rear seats and the overall storage space is still a bit below that of the competition. One person told me it seemed more like a large hatchback than a traditional crossover.

However, in terms of anecdotal information, I purchased a 9-foot tube of material and was able to feed the box through the back, between the front seats, and up on the dash. It rode just fine, and I can’t imagine you’ll be transporting too many things longer than 9 feet.

As for materials, I’ll give the C-HR a B+. Again, better than I expected for a car priced in the low $20s.

The Drive

Here’s where Toyota, I believe, will turn their attention next. The C-HR, for all its snazzy looks and functionality, is just too pokey.

You can forget about the 0-60 speeds, which practically can be timed with a calendar. It’s just not a fast car. But that’s also not important to many people who just want good, comfortable transportation and don’t need to be the first one to the party.

Given that disclaimer, however, I can add that when it does get up to speed, the ride is smooth and comfortable. I noted some fairly high cabin noise, but nothing too distracting.

Steering and braking are good, if not great. I’ll rate the overall ride at a C, a grade that was dinged primarily because of that wimpy acceleration.

The Tech

Depending on your trim level, the C-HR delivers a nice array of tech features. I thought the infotainment screen was easy to navigate and basically intuitive. Sometimes I need to skim the owner’s manual of these review cars, but not this time.

Toyota has added Apple CarPlay to the ’19, although as of this review they haven’t budged on their stance to not include Android Auto. According to some at Toyota the decision is based on “customer privacy concerns.”

They do point out, however, that Android users can be quite happy with the Toyota Entune system and app suite.

The Bottom Line

As noted, the price point of the C-HR makes this a subcompact crossover that will find lots of interested buyers. Toyota’s reputation for quality and reliability helps, too.

I’m willing to bet that we won’t have to wait long for a boost in engine performance and the addition of all-wheel-drive.

But for now, with a price tag below $25k the C-HR is a fun, attractive, and capable crossover.


The Details

2019 Toyota C-HR XLE
2-L, 4-cylinder engine
Front-wheel-drive
Mileage: 27/31/29 combined
MSRP: $22,980
As tested: $24,710

Reviewed by Dom Testa
Car provided by manufacturer

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Review: 2019 Toyota C-HR


Subcompact crossover vehicles are becoming quite the rage, because they offer the kind of utility/cargo space that on-the-go urbanites are looking for, without the gargantuan size. Basically, they’ll dart around town and they’re easy to park.

The Toyota C-HR was originally going to be produced under the Scion brand until that division was shut down.

It provides a fun, sporty look with capable handling and good mileage. What it doesn’t provide is peppy acceleration, nor all-wheel-drive — which surprised me. Coloradoans will have to make do with front-wheel-drive only.

(For what it’s worth, I drove to the radio station one day in the snow and the C-HR handled like a champ.)

The Basics

The C-HR (which stands for Compact High Rider) is available this year in three trim levels, after Toyota added the upper-tier Limited model for this year. The base unit is the LE, followed by the XLE (which I drove).

All three come with a standard 2.0-liter, 4 cylinder engine which puts out 144 horsepower. The exterior styling is one of the things current owners seem to point out often, with its somewhat-edgy design and charismatic stance.

One of those catchy gimmicks is a rear-door handle that’s up high, near the roof line. I never could decide if I liked that or not, but at least it’s interesting.

You’ll find a decent stock of standard features regardless of the trim level, but you will have to upgrade to the Limited if you want leather upholstery or heated front seats.

My XLE sports 18-inch alloy wheels and a nice slew of Toyota safety systems, including power-folding mirrors and keyless ignition.

The Interior

You’ll get some good with a little bit of not-so-good. I found the front seats to be pretty comfortable, even with the somewhat-limited choices of seat adjustments. Riders in the back will find a decent amount of room, especially considering this is a subcompact crossover.

Those passengers in the back will have to make do with limited visibility, too, as the roof pillars require you to lean forward in order to get a good glimpse of the passing world. Or maybe your passengers would simply appreciate the privacy.

I like the layout of the dash and the displays, which all seemed easy to read and to work with. Visibility for the driver and front passenger are quite good.

Let’s call the upfront storage space adequate. Again, it’s a smaller vehicle so we shouldn’t expect cavernous bins. Up front you get a traditional round cupholder and another with that hip, new square holder that accommodates awkward containers. The center armrest bin is good-sized.

Lower the rear seats and the overall storage space is still a bit below that of the competition. One person told me it seemed more like a large hatchback than a traditional crossover.

However, in terms of anecdotal information, I purchased a 9-foot tube of material and was able to feed the box through the back, between the front seats, and up on the dash. It rode just fine, and I can’t imagine you’ll be transporting too many things longer than 9 feet.

As for materials, I’ll give the C-HR a B+. Again, better than I expected for a car priced in the low $20s.

The Drive

Here’s where Toyota, I believe, will turn their attention next. The C-HR, for all its snazzy looks and functionality, is just too pokey.

You can forget about the 0-60 speeds, which practically can be timed with a calendar. It’s just not a fast car. But that’s also not important to many people who just want good, comfortable transportation and don’t need to be the first one to the party.

Given that disclaimer, however, I can add that when it does get up to speed, the ride is smooth and comfortable. I noted some fairly high cabin noise, but nothing too distracting.

Steering and braking are good, if not great. I’ll rate the overall ride at a C, a grade that was dinged primarily because of that wimpy acceleration.

The Tech

Depending on your trim level, the C-HR delivers a nice array of tech features. I thought the infotainment screen was easy to navigate and basically intuitive. Sometimes I need to skim the owner’s manual of these review cars, but not this time.

Toyota has added Apple CarPlay to the ’19, although as of this review they haven’t budged on their stance to not include Android Auto. According to some at Toyota the decision is based on “customer privacy concerns.”

They do point out, however, that Android users can be quite happy with the Toyota Entune system and app suite.

The Bottom Line

As noted, the price point of the C-HR makes this a subcompact crossover that will find lots of interested buyers. Toyota’s reputation for quality and reliability helps, too.

I’m willing to bet that we won’t have to wait long for a boost in engine performance and the addition of all-wheel-drive.

But for now, with a price tag below $25k the C-HR is a fun, attractive, and capable crossover.


The Details

2019 Toyota C-HR XLE
2-L, 4-cylinder engine
Front-wheel-drive
Mileage: 27/31/29 combined
MSRP: $22,980
As tested: $24,710

Reviewed by Dom Testa
Car provided by manufacturer

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